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June/July 2016 Monthly Newsletter

College of Arts and Sciences monthly update

June/July 2016

Tony RoarkDear Friends,

In one particularly downcast scene in Shakespeare’s King Richard II, a Welch Captain Iaments, “‘Tis thought that the King is dead; we will not stay. / The bay-trees in our country are all wither’d, / And meteors fright the fixed stars of heaven, / The pale-fac’d moon looks bloody on the earth…” The Earl of Salisbury continues to play darkly on the celestial themes: “Ah, Richard!  With the eyes of heavy mind / I see thy glory like a shooting star / Fall to the base earth from the firmament. / Thy sun sets weeping in the lowly west, / Witnessing storms to come, woe, and unrest.”

The Bard has an uncanny ability to draw out such metaphors in ways that manage to propel plot and character development while simultaneously edifying his audience about the nature of the metaphor’s vehicle. As this example nicely illustrates, he was a master of both the arts and sciences.

You can learn more about Shakespeare and celestial science in this month’s newsletter. Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Tony Roark

Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Boise State University

 

 

Shakespeare First Folio is coming to Boise State University

Boise State University is honored to First Folio event logohost First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare on tour from the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC. The exhibit features an original First Folio – the first published collection of Shakespeare’s plays- printed in London in 1623.

This is the first time in history a First Folio will visit Idaho! The exhibit runs from Aug. 20 -Sept. 21, 2016 in the Arts and Humanities Institute Gallery in the Yanke Family Research Park.


chemistry professor posing in lab

Chemistry Professor’s Seed Grant Explores Origins of Planet

For thousands of years, humanity has looked to the stars for answers. How did our planet form? Where do we fit into the whole cosmic scheme? And when and where did it all begin?
Clues embedded in meteorites — bits of “failed planets,” if you will — may provide some answers.

These chunks of space debris, formed at the beginning of our solar system billions of years ago, contain organic compounds that are essential to all known life. However, when scientists study what’s inside meteorites today, it doesn’t necessarily reflect the composition billions of years ago. That’s because radionuclides inside a meteorite have decayed over time and released radiation that likely affected the original chemical composition.

Boise State assistant professor of chemistry Mike Callahan recently received a $50,000 seed grant from the ELSI Origins Network (EON) to shed new light on how high-energy radiation processing contributed to the organic inventory of asteroids and primitive planets.

READ MORE ABOUT PROFESSOR MIKE CALLAHAN HERE >


students white water rafting

Boise State Alumnus Seeks to Tame the Wave at Whitewater Park

A Boise State alumnus is using his degree to attempt to create better waves for surfers and kayakers at Boise River Park (colloquially known as Whitewater Park). Tim Ronan, who graduated from Boise State in 2014 with a bachelor’s degree in geophysics, is attempting to mathematically quantify how whitewater rapids move, in order to orchestrate better, more reliable waves for water sports.

“All waves produce acoustic noise,” explained Ronan, who is now earning his master’s in geophysics from the University of North Carolina. “We’re monitoring how they generate sound waves into the atmosphere and how they push on the ground to try and quantify them.”

READ MORE ABOUT ALUMNUS TIM RONAN HERE >


art canvases

Faculty, Students, Alumni Awarded Alexa Rose Foundation Grants

A number of art department faculty members, graduate students and alumni were chosen to receive 2016 visual art grant awards from the Alexa Rose Foundation, which was established to honor the memory of local artist Alexa Rose Howell.

The foundation awarded $64,000 to 30 Idaho visual artists. Grants ranged from $250 to $5,000 for specific projects or to help cover the cost of continuing education, travel or research. Grant awardees represented a variety of backgrounds, including painting, photography, digital art, video, mixed media, printmaking, metalwork, sculpture and glass.

READ MORE ABOUT THE GRANTS TO BOISE STATE ARTISTS HERE >


 

Talkin’ Broncos Teach Oratory Skills to Idaho Inmates

This spring, members of the Talkin’ Broncos, Boise State’s Boise State Talkin Bronco team at Linfield Collegenationally award-winning speech and debate team, piloted a program to bring their oratory skills to an unusual group of students: inmates serving time at the Idaho State Correctional Center (ISCC).

On Tuesday, May 17, the Talkin’ Broncos graduated their first class of incarcerated orators through the Boise State Prison Debate Initiative. Participants celebrated their completion of the program with a British Parliament style debate between ISCC graduates and members of the Talkin’ Broncos.

“Watching the inmates grow and be successful was honestly life changing for me, and I am grateful to have gotten to be a part of the program,” said Mackenzie Moss, vice president of the Talkin’ Broncos. “One inmate expressed to me that he found a new reason to get out of bed in the morning and to live. He said that before it was hard to have much hope even for life post-release, but that after joining the program he felt impassioned to learn and to live up to his potential.”

READ MORE ABOUT THE TALKING BRONCOS HERE >


Gorongosa National Park Visited by Boise State Bird Team

John Kelly, manager of photographic services, is on assignment at Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, Africa, with the Boise State vulture research team and Idaho Bird Observatory.

IBO and Boise State Raptor Research visit to Gorongosa National Park, John Kelly photo.The team consists of Greg Kaltenecker, Marc Bechard, Eric Hallingstad and Gorongosa intern Diolinda Mundoza. They are accompanied by a National Geographic film crew while in the park.

Kaltenecker, executive director of the Intermountain Bird Observatory, is leading a team of raptor biologists to trap vultures in Gorongosa National Park. Of the five vulture species found in Gorongosa, four are listed on the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Red List as endangered or critically endangered.

READ MORE ABOUT THE GORONGOSA NATIONAL PARK IN AFRICA HERE >


Grad Accepted to Prestigious JET Program in Japan

Alex Jones earned a bachelor’s degree in English with a Alex Jones in Japanteaching emphasis and a minor in Japanese from Boise State this spring, and since graduation he has been busy preparing to travel to Japan and begin a new job at the prestigious Japanese Exchange and Teaching Program (JET).

The JET program began in 1987 with the goal of promoting and enhancing foreign language education for Japanese youth, as well as developing and fostering international relationships and cultural understanding between Japanese and foreign youth. About 60,000 students have participated since it was founded.

READ MORE ABOUT ALEX JONES HERE >


Boise State University Fine Arts Building. A state-of-the-art facility for fine arts that complements and deepens Boise State's involvement in the city and region's celebrated arts and culture community. Click here to learn more.


Christian Winn

Alumnus, Adjunct Prof Named Idaho Writer in Residence

Boise State alumnus and adjunct writing instructor Christian Winn has been named Writer in Residence by the Idaho Commission on the Arts. Winn earned an MFA in Creative Writing at Boise State in 2003. His three-year term includes four annual readings throughout the state, largely in rural communities, and a $10,000 award.

Winn is the author of the short story collection “Naked Me,” published by Dock Street Press in 2014. A second book, titled “What’s Wrong with You is What’s Wrong with Me,” is scheduled to be released in fall.

READ MORE ABOUT CHRISTIAN WINN HERE >


Phillip Hammer posing in lab

Grad Student’s NASA Fellowship to Aid Meteorite Research

Phillip Hammer, a master’s student in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, has been selected for a prestigious NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship (NESSF).

These fellowships support the continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed to achieve NASA’s scientific goals. Financial support for the NESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate’s four science divisions: earth science, heliophysics, astrophysics and planetary science.

READ MORE ABOUT HAMMER’S FELLOWSHIP HERE >


group at excavation site

Boise State Establishing Excavation Site in Libarna, Italy

A group of researchers and students headed by Katie Huntley, assistant professor of ancient history and archaeology at Boise State University, will work this summer to establish excavation of the Roman settlement of Libarna, Italy.

The Boise State contingent will include up to six student volunteers, including current history majors and a graduate who previously worked with Huntley in Pompeii, Italy.

The Boise State contingent will include up to six student volunteers, including current history majors and a graduate who previously worked with Huntley in Pompeii, Italy.

The project, expected to spread over at least five summers, is a joint endeavor with Texas Tech University and England’s Leicester University. Researchers will study the cultural and economic development of the town originally settled during the Iron Age by the Liguri people of Northwest Italy and later colonized by the Romans in the third century BCE.

READ MORE ABOUT THE ITALY EXCAVATION SITE HERE >


Doug Bullock studio portrait

Doug Bullock Named Third Associate Dean

Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics College of Arts and Sciences

Doug Bullock has been named the third associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. He has been with the mathematics department since 1995 and served as chair from 2007-2012. He then worked for a year in the Provost’s office as director of academic analysis and logistics.

READ MORE ABOUT DOUG BULLOCK HERE >


COAS IN ACTION

Lisa Brady portrait

Lisa Brady

Professor
Department of History

Lisa Brady will be a fellow at the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society at the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich, Germany, for 2016-17.

Brady will reside in Munich to complete her research project, “Capitalist Pigs: International Aid Agencies and Agricultural Development in South Korea, 1945-1961.”


picture of Anthropology chair and professor John Ziker

John Ziker

Department Chair and Professor
Department of Anthropology

John Ziker recently published a paper in Current Anthropology, widely known as one of the top five journals in its field. Ziker’s paper, “The Evolution of Ambition: Why We Strive for Success,” uses a study on the wealth factors influencing male reproductive success in Siberia to make its case.

READ MORE ABOUT JOHN’S PAPER HERE >


picture of English adjunct instructor Kerri WebsterKerri Webster

Adjunct Instructor
Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Program

Poet Kerri Webster has been named an Idaho Commission on the Arts fellow, along with former Boise State adjunct writing instructor, short story writer and screenwriter Alan Heathcock, writer and poet J. Reuben Appelman, and poet Devin Becker.  The fellowships recognize individual excellence on a three-year rotation of disciplines: Craft, Design and Visual Arts; Performing and Media Arts; and Literature.


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ABOUT THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
The College of Arts and Sciences enhances the scientific, ethical, and cultural foundation of our society through education, research, creative activity, and community engagement, thereby improving individual and collective quality of life.  Our faculty, staff, and students discover and share knowledge, understand and appreciate diversity, create and analyze art, and engage and enrich our local and global communities. The College of Arts and Sciences is made up of sixteen departments, six interdisciplinary programs and six research units.